Shingles Goes Epidemic: Chicken Pox Vax to Blame

February 18, 2013

18 Feb (GAIA HEALTH) – Chicken pox vax gives little protection, kills & maims many, and treatment may kill children who’d have lived through the disease. So more children probably die now from vaccines & chicken pox than died of chicken pox before modern medicine. Worse, the vaccine may be triggering a new epidemic of shingles.     By Heidi Stevens

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Shingles is rapidly becoming epidemic, and the indirect cause is the chicken pox vaccine. Since shingles is the reemergence of chicken pox, that does seem counterintuitive. Nonetheless, the facts do prove the connection. Once they enter your body, chicken pox viruses never leave. It doesn’t matter whether the virus entered by natural infection or by injection of a live attenuated virus in a vaccine. The virus, called varicella, hides in the central nervous system along a nerve root, and any nerve root will do. Normally, that’s not a big problem—but the situation is changing.

Historically, a few people would develop shingles, generally during a period of stress or reduced immune system function. In those cases, the varicella virus moves outward along the nerve root to whatever area of the body is served by it. It causes a rash, which is quite painful and usually lasts around a month. Most people never have a second bout of shingles.

CHICKEN POX

Before the chicken pox vaccine, most children got the disease by the age of ten. In the US, about 3.7 million children would get chicken pox every year. About 50 children would die of the disease, and virtually all were immunocompromised. While the death of any child is sad, the reality is that the mortality rate in children was only 0.00135 percent. This doesn’t even come close to a life-threatening epidemic.

On the other hand, adults who get chicken pox have a complication rate of 20%, including pneumonia, bacterial infections, and brain inflammations. Each year, about 50 adults would die of chicken pox prior to the vaccine. Therefore, it was clearly preferable to deal with chicken pox during childhood.

While it’s true that we see less chicken pox than before, it still does happen. While the usual claim is that the vaccine is over 70% effective, the reality appears to be significantly less than that, perhaps as low as 40%. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) state that they don’t really know how common chicken pox now is, but:

Chickenpox outbreaks continue to occur even in settings such as schools where most children are vaccinated with one dose.[2]

Clearly, the vaccine is not very effective. Of course, the response is typical. They’ve added another dose to the schedule.

A DEVELOPING SHINGLES EPIDEMIC

But there’s an even darker side to this picture: shingles. Shingles is a far more serious condition. At a minimum, it causes a rash along the path that a nerve root serves, along with severe pain that lasts for around a month. Mercola reports that it can also lead to “bacterial skin infections, Hutchinson’s sign, Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, motor neuropathy, meningitis, hearing loss, blindness, and bladder impairment”[1].

Now shingles is increasing. Worse, we’re seeing children get it. Though it’s still rare in them, the fact is that children virtually never suffered from shingles until the chicken pox vaccine was implemented.

But why would shingles be increasing, with even children succumbing, when there’s a chicken pox vaccine? It turns out, as documented by the statistical analysis of Gary S. Goldman[3], that exposure to children with chicken pox boosts one’s immunity to shingles. The mechanism isn’t known, but the protection is real.

The UK’s Public Health Laboratory Service has found that adults who live with children and are exposed to chicken pox as a result receive protection against shingles[4]. In other words, exposure to active cases of chicken pox results in a boost to the immune system’s ability to prevent shingles attacks.

Now that children are getting chicken pox less often, the adults in their lives are unlikely to come into contact with active chicken pox. The result is more and more shingles, with all the pain and adverse effects entailed.

For more on this article go to GAIA Health.

Tags: , , , , ,

You must be logged in to comment

Log in